Cacophony 

After a couple of hours, this…


  
  

A couple of close ups of the Cymbal Branches

  

The Hi Hat and left Double Bass Pedal


…and the Main Bass Pedal Contraption


Note the protective patch stuck to the head.

The Main Bass Pedal Contraption has an issue. It’s a design that’s three decades newer than the Bass Drum, and so doesn’t quite fit. The problem is that it’s too wide to fit nicely between the two tuning rods. This picture highlights the interfering rods…


I tried to make it work, but it sat at an angle (look at the impact marks on the contact patch above) and just doesn’t look or feel right. Naturally, I decided to undertake exceptional measures as a first resort. Drastic surgery.

Here’s the T handles… 

First, I cut off the bars…

  

Then, I filed the truncated blocks roughly cylindrical…

  
  

I ended up with a rough result…


…which was then polished by this method…


The result isn’t perfect, but it’ll do…


Using a hacksaw, I cut slots to fit my 5mm screwdriver. These are the finished rods…


Now the pedals fit snugly.

Well, that’s my kit brought back to life. I’m very pleased with the result.

The pictures I took of this process provide a good record of when I started and finished, as the date of capture is recorded.  I began mid February, about three weeks after being told off by the Consultant, and finished at the beginning of May. So about 12 weeks.

So how does it sound? Big. Boomy. Bassy. Bouncy. Resonant. Silky. Loud. Deafening.

Now that I’ve been playing it over a month, I’ve been able to adjust the tuning and get a good sound and feel. The bouncy bass drum is taking a while to get used to, but I love the sound of it. With no padding – I hate padded drums – it sounds big, with great tone and sustain. Adjusting the pedal springs is gradually finding a good balance with that. The toms growl.

The only thing I’m not getting on with is this…



That patch in the middle is bugging me. Maybe I’m not tuning it correctly or something, but it feels dead. I’m not able to do good double sticking on it. I’ll persevere with it for a while though, because it has a good loud crack when one hits it hard – which I guess it’s designed for.

I’ve half a mind to track down the rest of my drums. Low priority, though.

Next, some good news

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Talking about Snares and Rackets…

Jesus answered: “My Kingdom is no part of this world. If my Kingdom were part of this world, my attendants would have fought that I should not be handed over to the Jews. But as it is, my Kingdom is not from this source.”

We’ve just had a General Election here in Britain. I think everyone got what they deserved. (Oops. Is that breaking my “stop judging…” rule? Or is it merely stating the facts?) As far as I’m concerned, I managed to ignore it almost entirely, and so am quite unstressed about it (see the quote above). Of course, one could argue that noone got what they deserved. It’s all too easy to be derisory about politics and politicians. In this system of things, though, what’s the alternative?

Snare Drum Stand

Anyway, all this election guff means the work’s not getting done – except in my workshop. As I said in a previous post, I’ve finished the drum kit a couple of weeks ago and have been having great fun getting to know it again.

This snare stand… 


Showed signs of poor storage… 


So, although I was originally going to leave it, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to take it apart and clean it (d’you think I’ve got one of them thar “disorders”?)

This mechanism was quite interesting…


It allows two axes of movement with one movement of a control. So, slackening the T nut allows the drum to be tilted left and right, forward and back. Up and down movement is by the normal sliding tube method. Ultimately, the geometry of this joint facilitates folding for transport. You can go from this…


…to this…


…to this…


The key to it is a split clamp in the middle…


Quite ingenious. This is all the parts dismantled and cleaned…


Once I’d put all back together and put the snare drum on it, I found an issue with the vertical adjustment. Without the weight of the drum, this vertical adjust nut…


…seemed tight enough, holding the tube in place. But with the – quite heavy – drum in place, the T nut would tighten so far but no further, allowing the tube to slide downwards. The problem and solution is in this picture…


Comparing the above two pictures explains the issue and the solution. The spacer nut is to stop the “wings” of the T nut fouling the stand. Everything now secure.

Right, that’s everything dismantled, cleaned and all the hardware put back together again. Before I could assemble the drums themselves, I needed to build this…


Come back soon to see how…