Triton Circular Saw Refurbishment E1

This machine was bought as the best one to use in the Triton Workcentre 2000. Coupled with the optional Height Winder Unit and a Dust Bag, it actually worked really well. If your careful with your setup – and we must be careful with anything sharp spinning at high speed – the entire ensemble is capable of repeatable sub-millimetre accuracy. 

I last used it during fitting out of the workshop, so that would be the end of 2006. I was quite good with hand saws by then, so it never saw the light of day again. So it’s been in the other shed, languishing, and moisture is the enemy of bare steel…

Obviously, there’s no way I can sell it like this and keep a good conscience, so it had to go through the MLW process. 

Let’s look at what we’ve got…

Before you’re tempted to write this off as a lost cause, here’s pictures of the saw as it is now…

Actually, apart from the rust spots on the blade and guard, it’s just thick wood dust and the odd scrape and ding. Proof of a working life.

Unscrew the four red knobs to release the saw from the Height Winder Unit…

The height winder unit  is just dusty. I’ll dismantle and clean that later.

I began by taking the saw blade off. There’s a metal button to press down on to immobilise the motor whilst you unbolt the blade…

Unlike other circular saws I’ve owned, this button clamps solidly.

Next, I went round the saw taking many close up pictures of all its components, from all sorts of different angles. This will help with reassembly. However, as Sod’s law dictates, it seems that the component that gives you the most difficulty in terms of relocation, is always the one with the photo missing. Quite often this involves screw lengths. I’ve recently started photographing all my screws next to a ruler.

This is the first part I took off…

…then I found that I couldn’t get the bolt out because the spring loaded guard was in the way…

So did I take the guard off? Nope. I must have been hypoxic that day, because I decided to take apart the front hinge instead. That spring loaded guard was a right pain during that process, but it still didn’t cross my mind to take it off.

This is the front hinge assembly…

There’s nothing complex about it; it all just unbolts and unscrews. I made sure to take photos of the internal arrangements during the process . It’s worth taking your time examining the internal details and taking more photos rather than less (still, I don’t seem to be able to take exactly the right picture…). It’s amazing where the wood dust gets forced into…

With the release of the hinge pin……and because I’d already undone this…

…I could separate the saw from its base. Dismantling the rear blade depth adjustment assembly…

…left the base clear for cleaning. It has the odd scrape or two, but no damage…

Would’ve been a lot easier if I’d taken off that guard…

Triton Router Table Refurbishment

I must admit, this doesn’t look too good…

There was lifting of the paint where the water had got in, on this table top. That was around where I’d drilled holes to take my shop made feather board. I contemplated trying to rectify it, but who’s got the time? So I bought a replacement.

This was a shop made fence I made up to improve dust extraction…

But as you can see, it has quite a lot of damage, so I threw it away. This is the original fence…

It had some MDF fences on it but they were nowhere to be found so I made some new ones from moisture proof MDF.

This is the fence and router tray being cleaned…

They were just dusty.

Some of the metal parts needed a cycle through the rust remover, but came out quite nice…

The fence and its dust extraction port reassembled (without the new MDF fences)…

…and with…

Undoing these fasteners allows the legs to drop out…

The table without legs…

It comes apart simply by undoing bolts…

I took the switch unit off, took it apart and gave everything a thorough clean…

The frame and legs cleaned up…

Assembly was easy, once again the reverse of dismantling. This is the completed unit…

This picture highlights the square holes where the legs are stored for transportation…

When I fitted the new table top, I noticed one of the securing lugs was damaged…

I emailed Dennis at Triton Woodworking Tools about it. We agreed it was probably damaged in transit. Unfortunately this table top was the very last one – the newer version of this router table is quite different – so I simply drilled out the rivet and used a little bolt to secure a good lug taken from the old top. Holds very securely.

That was a quick and easy refurb and the table and router look pristine, ready for its new owner.