Holding your tool securely…

..do not be quick to take offense, for the taking of offense lodges in the bosom of fools…

…is of paramount importance when using a lathe. This lathe came with several devices to hold tools. Here’s a couple…

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The one on the left is holding a knurler. The one on the right looks like it’ll fit on the Cross Slide, rather than the Top Slide, like this one…

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I was quite pleased to find this in the box, especially as it came with four cartridges…

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…each of which are very similar to the ones in use on the Lathes at Axminster…

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At least it’s something familiar now. The cartridges slide out after loosening a cam. This means you can have four tools ready to go. As the tool height adjuster is on the cartridge, there’s also no need to reset that every time; remembering how important tool cutting edge height is.

This is the main body, with the two tool cartridges removed..

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The two hex heads turn eccentric shafts which cause the square Locks to move in and out, helped by an internal spring. To pull the shafts out, one has to hold in the spring loaded Lock…

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…and the shaft pulls out easily…

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There’s a little spring in there…

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The dirty body with Locks, Eccentric Shafts and springs…

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The four Cartridges, one without a tool and the one at front right has a wedge device to secure the tool, a parting off tool, and the one at front left is reversed…

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Showing four securing screws and the height adjuster…

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In this picture, the height adjuster is dismantled. The screw to the left is a depth stop, to secure the large nut once it is adjusted…

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The parting off tool holder has this wedge arrangement…

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All four cartridges were dismantled. On one of them, the threaded rod for the height adjuster was slightly bent. This is what happened when I used Big Hammer to try to straighten it…

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Now I’ve got some cartridge spares. Dang.

Cleaning was in the usual manner. Here’s the team photo (minus the dead cartridge)…

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When I reassembled the body parts, the action felt gritty and grindy, so took it apart again and cleaned up the moving parts. I chucked the shafts in the drill for polishing, or at least taking off the rough spots. The parts seemed to be made roughly, evidenced by the wear all round. Here’s before…

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…and after…

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The height adjuster nuts were given a polish at their business ends, to make the action smoother. This picture shows one finished next to an unfinished one…

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I cleaned up all the bores as well, using a mandrel wrapped with 1500 paper. This is the body reassembled, using some VG68 as lubricant…

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A centre post screws back on to the Top Slide…

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The body is dropped over it and secured with the large nut…

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Reassembled cartridges with tools…

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…and locked into the body…

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This the cam and height adjuster nut in the unlocked position…

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…and in the locked position…

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I’ve still to have a go at sharpening the tools. I’m rereading “The Amateur’s Lathe” by L H Sparey, where information on that sort of thing is abundant.

Next, chucks…

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3 thoughts on “Holding your tool securely…

  1. The thing that mounts on the crosslide is a rear parting tool. Nice work on the cleanup . your S7 looks pristine compared to my battle worn species of ML7

  2. Hi,

    A parting tool is used for, well parting off.. (i.e. cutting the part off in the lathe once you finished it). On a small lathe like a ML7 it is supposed to be better to use a tool and part from the rear rather that sticking one in the tool holder on the front (like that vertical blade like thing) (I had a brain malfunction I think due to the colour of the modern lathe from your course that is much like an Super 7).

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