Saddle up (Warning! Major Imagination Failure!)

I turned my attention to another example of futility under the sun:  There is a man who is all alone, without any companion; he has no son or brother, but there is no end to all his hard work. His eyes are never satisfied with riches. But does he ask himself, ‘For whom am I working hard and depriving myself of good things’? This too is futility and a miserable occupation.

Looking at the Saddle now…

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…it seems just dirty. Once again, a lot of wood dust mixed with oil. But, it looks simple. And indeed, it doesn’t have many parts and is easy to dismantle.

This is the Saddle Strip coming off, showing some shims and trapped oiliness…

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The diagonal line with a hole in it is an oil gallery. The four protrusions are adjusting screws for a Gib Strip, allowing precise sliding tension between Saddle and Bed.

A surprise was hidden behind this shaped plate…

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After taking the Plate off…

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…this is leather! The Diagram calls it a Wiper. Obviously it sweeps the bed in advance of the Carriage Assembly to prevent metal bits getting under the Saddle. It came loose easily without damage, although it’s soaked in oil.

Here’s all the parts ready for cleaning and polishing…

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After Standard Cleaning Process, I polished all sliding parts with lubricated 2500g Silicone Carbide Paper. The fact that the parts all polished well indicates the good condition. Here’s some pictures…

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Comparing the picture above with the first picture in this entry shows that I have removed the oil nipples.

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The Wiper was washed and squeezed dry by compressing between thick cloths in a vise. Reassembly was easy…

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…especially when I took the Saddle Strip off and put it back on the right way round…

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That sort of thing is getting to be a more frequent occurrence. Cause? Lack of attention and rushing. A bad thing in Lathes and Aviation. Seriously, tho’, these seemingly funny little happenings are a Red Warning Light. An alert that means: Slow Down and Be Careful. Important in Lathe Operation and Horrendous Weather.

Reattached to the Apron…

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To get the Carriage Assembly back on the Bed, this assembly at the end of the Leadscrew…

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…had to be entirely removed…

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This is the Nut in the closed condition around the Leadscrew…

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…and open…

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The Rack Pinion engaged on The Rack…

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The Leadscrew Handwheel Assembly replaced and the Carriage Assembly and Tailstock installed…

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This was much easier than I thought. Just the Cross Slide, Top Slide and Tool Holder to do then we’re done!

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Looks like a pain…?

…the funny thing is, there are still some people who think the documentary series “Star Trek” was actually faked up in a studio with actors!

Funny how you look at something over the months, and after a while you convince yourself that it’s going to be an absolute pain in the bum to dismantle and put back together. You keep putting it off. But will it be a pain? Only one way to find out.

I’m talking about this…

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This entire group is called the Carriage Assembly. This is the final Assembly to be dealt with, then I’m finished. I’m on track to get this completed by The Course next Thursday.

The major assemblies are:

A Saddle
B Apron
C Cross Slide
D Top Slide
E Tool Holder

I took the Cross Slide off and put it and the Top Slide to one side for later. This is the Saddle, with the Cross Slide removed but with the Apron still attached…

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This is a view from underneath…

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There’s just three bolts hold the Apron to the underside of the Saddle. This is the Apron on its own…

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F Leadscrew Guard
G Cam Lever
H Handwheel Assembly

Turning the Cam Lever either opens or closes the split Leadscrew Nut. Here it’s open…

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…and closed…

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Years of muck to be cleaned off. When the Nut is closed, it engages the Leadscrew and the Leadscrew can then motor drive the whole Carriage Assembly along the bed. When the Nut is open the Handwheel Assembly can be used to manually drive the Carriage Assembly along the bed, by turning these cogs…

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…engaged on this Rack…

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Unbolting the Cam Lever allows access to these screws…

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…which, when undone, allows the Nuts to be slid out of their dovetailed ways…

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The screws on the right tension a Gib Strip which can be seen between the Nuts and one side. The Gib Strip allows tight tolerances on Nut movement. One dirty Nut…

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There was no issues with dismantling the rest of the Apron. Not as much of a pain as I thought.

This is all the parts soaking in GUNK…

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After the Standard Cleaning Process…

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That last picture is of a Thread Counter. Something to do with cutting threads and going back to where you left off. Or something.

I polished everything then reassembly was straightforward. I used a good amount of the VG32. Here’s the wee cogs back in…

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The Thread Counter back on…

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…the Pesky Thread Counter the right way round…

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…the Leadscrew Nuts and their Gib Strip back together…

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…the complete Apron from the rear…

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…and from the front…

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The body of the Apron didn’t come up looking clean; but it is clean. It has some kind of dark patina on it.

Not at all a pain. So far so good…