Headstock Part D

Have you seen a man hasty with his words? There is more hope for a fool than for him.

Quite a long gap since my last post. Quite unintentional. All of us who are caught in the vicious, selfish claws of this world, have our time devoured by the Money Men. But, they themselves are enslaved by their god, Profit. It’s 2014; we’ve learned nothing over the past few thousand years.

Ho hum. In the workshop, I’ve managed to grab a few hours here and there, and so, although I’m behind in my plan to get this finished by the end of July, I’m still making progress. I’m behind with my posts, but not that far behind with the Lathe itself.

In the last post, I finished cleaning the Headstock Assembly. This post describes fettling it a bit, reassembly and reinstalling.

To begin, I gave the spindle a smooth over with 2500g Wet and Dry paper (silicone carbide paper) lubricated with the VG32 oil. Hopefully this will make all the parts slide back on more easily.

I bolted the Backgear Key on to the 65T Backgear…

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…then pushed that back onto the Spindle…

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It engages with a key to stop it turning on the Spindle and is secured by a grub screw. Before I could put the Vee Cone Pulley Assembly onto the Spindle, I smoothed out it’s inner bronzy surface with the 2500 and oil, doing the same to the inner surface of the Distance Sleeve, like this…

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The Distance Sleeve was a tight fit, so needed some persuasion. I rigged up a jig in my vise, and used the white rubber Persuader to get it seated correctly…

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On the iPad in that picture is another picture of the Spindle Assembly before dismantling. I’m using that to aid in location during assembly.

As these parts get more complicated, I’m finding it crucial to think even more carefully about what photos I need to take as I dismantle things. It’s already paying off. This Headstock reassembly proved straightforward as a result.

The Thrust Bearing, Thrust Washer and Locking Collar all went on easily. The 25T Gear on the end, which needed effort to remove, went on quite easily after it’s inner surface was smoothed with 2500 and oil. Here’s the complete Spindle Assembly…

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Turning to the Headstock body, I smoothed the insides with 2500 and oil..

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…making it easy to push the Backgear Eccentric Assembly back in…

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This Backgear Eccentric Assembly needs to be free to rotate and is rotated by this lever which I’ve bolted back on…

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Pulling on the knob retracts a plunger which allows the lever to be moved to one of two positions. One of the two plunger mortices can be seen. This, the 21/56T Backgear Cluster…

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…is then rotated up or down by the Backgear Eccentric Assembly, engaging with the 65T Backgear Assembly and the Vee Cone Pulley Assembly. The purpose seems to get the 65T Backgear to run slowly. This next picture might help…

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AB Vee Cone Pulley Assembly
CD 65T Backgear Assembly, permanently connected to S
EF 21/56T Backgear Cluster, free to rotate on…
G Backgear Eccentric Assembly, operated by…
H Backgear Lever
S Spindle

Here’s how drive is transmitted. A belt from the Motor arrives at the Pulley A, which turns gear B. If Backgear Key C is retracted – as it is in the picture – and Lever H is in the down position thereby keeping EF disengaged, then AB will spin, driving nothing.

If C is engaged with B, and Lever H is down, then B is connected to D, the 65T Backgear, which will turn Spindle S at the same speed as the Pulley.

If C is retracted and Lever H is up – as it is in the picture – then EF is engaged and drive is transmitted through B to E to F to D, turning S at a much slower speed than Pulley A.

However, if C is engaged and Lever H is up, then the Spindle S is locked and won’t turn.

I’m glad we’ve cleared that up. This is me fitting one of the bronzy (we never really got to the bottom of that, did we?) tumbler gears to the Tumbler Reverse Lever…

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Once the Tumbler Reverse Stud is fitted…

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…the Tumbler Reverse Lever, carrying the two bronzy Tumbler Gears is fitted onto the Stud, followed by the Tumbler Sleeve Gear…

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Had enough? Me too…

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Headstock Part III

The young apprentice thought he could save some money by buying the cheapest hammer available. Soon the handle split. On the advice of his betters, he replaced the handle with a really good quality, straight grained hickory one. Shortly after that, the head shattered. On the advice of his elders, he replaced the head with one made with the proper metal. Now he had a good hammer…

The spindle looks like it is a complicated piece and I approached it with trepidation. If I damage this, won’t that ruin the entire lathe?

Ah, who cares. It’s an inanimate object. Knowing that fortune favours the brave, I jumped in with both feet without looking. With a big hammer.

Here’s the spindle assembly before surgery…

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All these parts are either fixed to the spindle by grub screws or are free to rotate on it. I found that one or two are a tight fit and needed “encouragement” to break free. I started at the left end because the spindle diameter was smaller there, so logically everything would slide off or on from that end…

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This little pinion (I know the lingo now) is the 25T Gear. The little so and so wouldn’t come off by hand effort so was the first candidate for rough treatment. Actually, applied physics – the lever arm…

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Carefully levering up with equal pressure either side got it to move. The Spindle is held upright in a vice – protected by leather – and I’m using two large screwdrivers as levers. It scratched the perpendicular sides of the pinion, which doesn’t matter, but I was very careful with the teeth. The fulcrum – the thicker dark ring underneath the pinion – is the Locking Collar, and is very hard; no damage at all. That ding wasn’t me. It simply unscrewed.

The slimmer metal ring beneath the Locking Collar is the Thrust Washer and also wouldn’t budge by hand, so I assembled this rig…

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…so I could use my rubber mallet on the spindle. That did it. The Thrust Washer is prevented from rotating by this pin…

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…which pulled out easily.

The next group of three rings is the Thrust Bearing and is a three part ball race. Here it is grouped together…

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…and two thirds of it, showing the captured ball bearings…

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They all just slid off.

The next assembly has three parts. The following picture shows:

A Distance Sleeve
B Vee Cone Pulley Assembly, which has pushed in to it…
C …another of those bronzy gears
D 65T Backgear Assembly

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At E, the grub screw with a hex key sticking out of it doesn’t fix part B to the spindle, but is a plug for a port to let oil into the inside of the bronzy gear. This is an inside view, showing the oil galleries…

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What is fixed to the Spindle is part D, the 65T Backgear. It is prevented from rotating by this Woodruff Key…

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…and secured by this grub screw…

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With that loose and the Pulley already loose it was clear that the Distance Sleeve was a friction fit and needed some concussion to move it along the Spindle, so I used the rig and mallet again…

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Finally, on the 65T Gear, there is a little part called the Backgear Key…

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Tightened by a hex bolt it slides up and away from, and down to engage into, the teeth of the Bronzy Gear in the Pulley, locking the Pulley and the Backgear together. Heaven knows why. I’ll no doubt find out on The Course.

This is the Spindle…

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I spent a long time cleaning and inspecting all the parts for damage. Usual method; soak in Green Gunk, scrub with toothbrushes, rinse and cloth dry, followed by hot air drying.

This picture shows all the parts, nice and clean, posing for a group photo…

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So, with all parts cleaned and inspected, reassembly is next. Thankfully, I didn’t break anything…