Headstock Part III

The young apprentice thought he could save some money by buying the cheapest hammer available. Soon the handle split. On the advice of his betters, he replaced the handle with a really good quality, straight grained hickory one. Shortly after that, the head shattered. On the advice of his elders, he replaced the head with one made with the proper metal. Now he had a good hammer…

The spindle looks like it is a complicated piece and I approached it with trepidation. If I damage this, won’t that ruin the entire lathe?

Ah, who cares. It’s an inanimate object. Knowing that fortune favours the brave, I jumped in with both feet without looking. With a big hammer.

Here’s the spindle assembly before surgery…

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All these parts are either fixed to the spindle by grub screws or are free to rotate on it. I found that one or two are a tight fit and needed “encouragement” to break free. I started at the left end because the spindle diameter was smaller there, so logically everything would slide off or on from that end…

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This little pinion (I know the lingo now) is the 25T Gear. The little so and so wouldn’t come off by hand effort so was the first candidate for rough treatment. Actually, applied physics – the lever arm…

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Carefully levering up with equal pressure either side got it to move. The Spindle is held upright in a vice – protected by leather – and I’m using two large screwdrivers as levers. It scratched the perpendicular sides of the pinion, which doesn’t matter, but I was very careful with the teeth. The fulcrum – the thicker dark ring underneath the pinion – is the Locking Collar, and is very hard; no damage at all. That ding wasn’t me. It simply unscrewed.

The slimmer metal ring beneath the Locking Collar is the Thrust Washer and also wouldn’t budge by hand, so I assembled this rig…

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…so I could use my rubber mallet on the spindle. That did it. The Thrust Washer is prevented from rotating by this pin…

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…which pulled out easily.

The next group of three rings is the Thrust Bearing and is a three part ball race. Here it is grouped together…

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…and two thirds of it, showing the captured ball bearings…

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They all just slid off.

The next assembly has three parts. The following picture shows:

A Distance Sleeve
B Vee Cone Pulley Assembly, which has pushed in to it…
C …another of those bronzy gears
D 65T Backgear Assembly

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At E, the grub screw with a hex key sticking out of it doesn’t fix part B to the spindle, but is a plug for a port to let oil into the inside of the bronzy gear. This is an inside view, showing the oil galleries…

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What is fixed to the Spindle is part D, the 65T Backgear. It is prevented from rotating by this Woodruff Key…

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…and secured by this grub screw…

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With that loose and the Pulley already loose it was clear that the Distance Sleeve was a friction fit and needed some concussion to move it along the Spindle, so I used the rig and mallet again…

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Finally, on the 65T Gear, there is a little part called the Backgear Key…

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Tightened by a hex bolt it slides up and away from, and down to engage into, the teeth of the Bronzy Gear in the Pulley, locking the Pulley and the Backgear together. Heaven knows why. I’ll no doubt find out on The Course.

This is the Spindle…

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I spent a long time cleaning and inspecting all the parts for damage. Usual method; soak in Green Gunk, scrub with toothbrushes, rinse and cloth dry, followed by hot air drying.

This picture shows all the parts, nice and clean, posing for a group photo…

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So, with all parts cleaned and inspected, reassembly is next. Thankfully, I didn’t break anything…

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