Triton Circular Saw Refurbishment E3

On inspection, I found a couple of issues to deal with.

  • Rust spots on the blade
  • A stiff armature bearing
  • A stiff and sticking trigger

The rust spots were easy to resolve. I coated them liberally in my non toxic rust remover gel, covered the whole blade in cling film and left it alone for a while…


After a while, I scrubbed it with wire wool using the gel itself as a lubricant. This got rid of most of the rust but it needed another application to make sure. This had the added bonus of completely cleaning the resin off the teeth; something worth bearing in mind. This was when I found the two missing teeth. I’ve no idea when this happened, but I must have made loads of cuts completely unaware they were missing, so it obviously has no effect on the quality of the cut. Blades can be replaced, though.

This is the outer bearing on the armature…

The contraption is just to hold it upright. It wouldn’t spin freely. The cure? A few drops of oil. This also cured the sticky trigger.

The bearing housings were full of grease impregnated with dust…

…so I cleaned them and the rest of the casings with GUNK…

The result…

No evidence of damage or wear. As far as the motor armature and the coils was concerned, I cleaned those with brushes and a hoover; no water or cleaning fluid got near them.

Assembly

First the brush loops were slipped back over their contacts, the coils slid back in and the wiring relaid as it was…

This is where detail photography comes in; to refer back to. Reconnecting and repacking the trigger assembly…

With the handle cover back on and the black plastic spacer in place, the armature simply drops in…

With the bearing and gear greased and the armature lock put in place, the blade housing can be dropped on…

In that last photo you can see that the lock spring has to go into the housing in a certain way. That was fiddly. The two halves secured together again…

With greasing as you go, the reduction gear was refitted…

Next the blade guard was refitted, taking care with the shims once again, not to mention the spring …

Next, final assembly…

…which was quite straightforward, making good use of the multitude of pictures.

The completed saw…

I was worried by that erstwhile sticky trigger, but when I plugged it in, it worked ! Phew.

Triton Circular Saw Refurbishment E2

Just a little while longer, and the wicked will be no more;
You will look at where they were,
And they will not be there.

Psalm 37:10

Is that why 50 somethings like workshops? We feel safe and secure whilst there, with the wicked firmly excluded and out of mind. Who are “the wicked” though? Is it “them”?¬†What if it’s you and me? How can we tell?

Something to ponder over whilst up to the elbows in Circular Saw Guts.

With the base removed, it’s time to get at the motor. With the inner blade clamp ring removed…

…we can get at this circlip…

Taking care with the spring, the guard just slides off…

This pesky bolt – mentioned in the previous post – can come out now…

Working progressively inwards (duh) the hub bolts are removed and the hub taken off. Watch out for the shims, they’re a bit flimsy and easily damaged…

There’s these plates to be removed next…

…then the main body bolts can be undone and the motor section slid out…

The armature can then be slid out of the rest of the motor. The clamp needs photographed so that it is replaced properly…

To get the coils out, we need to take the handle section – containing the trigger assembly – apart. Remove this plastic spacer…

Undo the screws and carefully prise the handle apart…

Get to work with the hoover and a brush to get rid of as much of the dust as possible, then you can see what’s what with the wiring…

I took plenty of pictures at this point, not just of the connections…

…but how it’s packed in as well…

Unscrew these two bolts..

…take the brushes out…

…push off the two coil spring brush connectors with a long screwdriver…

…then the coil assembly can be slid out. At first I couldn’t see how to achieve this, but eventually I found that I could just put my fingers in, push out centripetally – with the main plastic body securely held – and pull it out. It was a tight fit and I had to be always mindful of the wires…

That’s disassembly completed.

Next, cleaning…